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planecrazy

Salt numbers

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After having some very inconsistent numbers in salt I wanted to start a thread that would hopefully get us motivated to know and understand the salt we use and why or why not.

My goal is to test each new bucket of salt twice. Once after several hours of being mixed and once more after it has had two or more days to sit and (as Cory says) age. I hope everyone will join in and help gather as much information as possible.

Can we please keep the face book posts and opinions out of this thread and just post information.

Thank you

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Seachem ReefSalt / RODI 0 TDS

First test

Temp: 78

SG: 1.024 (refrac)

Alk: 7.8 (Hanna)

Ca: 480 (salifert)

Mg: 1200 (salifert)

Ph: 8.0 (salifert)

Second test 2-3 days latter

Every thing close to the same except alk

Alk: 5.7

Edited by planecrazy

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Wow that is a quick drop off in Alk.... I'll post my numbers when I get a chance for RedSea Coral Pro salt.

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Seachem ReefSalt

First test

Temp: 78

SG: .024

Alk: 7.8

Ca: 480

Mg: 1200

Ph: 8.0

Second test 2-3 days latter

Every thing close to the same except alk

Alk: 5.7

Wondering why my alk is at 10 all the time in my tank and I always use sachem reefsalt

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Instant ocean reef crystals

SG: 1.024 (refractometer)

ph: 8.20 (instant read)

temp: 76.6 (instant read)

Ca: 450 ppm (Elos)

Mg: 1440 (salifert)

Alk: 215 ppm or 12.04 dkh (Hanna Checker)

2 days later.

Everything stayed the same except ALK went up to 222 ppm or 12.43 dkh

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Red Sea Coral Pro:

TEMP: 79 (probe)

SG: 1.025 (refrac.)

PH: 8.4 (probe)*

Alk: 10 ish (hanna)*

Cal: 440 (red sea pro)

Mg: 1450 (red sea pro)*

I: .05 (red sea pro)

*Mg tends to run high with this salt. Alk is usually at 12 when first mixed (one reason I age), Ph will be 8.4 until I age which drops to 8.2-8.0.

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Reef crystals / RODI 0 TDS

Temp: 78

SG: 1.024 (refrac)

Alk: 10.8 (salifert)

Ca: 400 (salifert)

Mg: 1200 (salifert)

Ph: 8-8.1 (salifert)

After two days Alk: 9.9 (Hanna)

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Reef crystals / RODI 0 TDS

Temp: 78

SG: 1.024 (refrac)

Alk: 10.8 (salifert)

Ca: 400 (salifert)

Mg: 1200 (salifert)

Ph: 8-8.1 (salifert)

After two days Alk: 9.9 (Hanna)

Good point with the TDS-- mine zero as well -- with higher tds you could also be reading elemental levels in your make-up water and not your salt.

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I was reading that buffering your DI water before you add your salt (for 24 hours before the salt) is important because the DI water will *often* have a low pH and will therefor require the salt that you add to buffer the water up to the desired pH. This means that there is less buffer in the salt water than the manufacturers intend. This could explain why you are seeing a drop in alk after letting it sit. Try buffering the DI water the day before you add the salt, and see if you have the same results?

Edited by Jooce01

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Yeah that's what I'm reading in Anthony calfo's book. If you're interested I can take a picture or type up the whole section.

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That makes sense. Although some salt manufactures make thier salts specifically for ro/di water with this in mind such as the Red Sea Coral Pro: "Specially formulated for the use with reverse osmosis water

Red Sea is please to announce the addition of an innovative new salt formula designed to meet the needs of today`s advanced hobbyist. Coral Pro Salt has been specifically formulated for use with "mineral free" Reverse Osmosis, or soft tap water and contains the elevated levels of calcium and buffer capacity".

Not selling anyone on this just showing that some salts are made with this in mind. This is why I feel the need to age my saltwater cause right out of the bucket Alk is usually higher than my tank.

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Very interesting. I might start experimenting with buffering my RO/DI water

Cory, thanks for that insight on the salt. I was unaware that any salt manufactures engineered salt with that in mind. This is something I'm going to have to research much more.

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Jooce01, I'm thinking about what you said and it dawned on me that there is another thing I do to my fresh salt water. I (obviously) use a power head to circulate the water but I also use the little Venturi with an air tube to inject air because the RO/DI filtering process not only strips all the minerals but O2 as well. So... If we don't replace the O2 we are dumping in O2 depleted water every WC.

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Oh yeah. I forgot to mention that ;) the book also talks about the need to airate the water to keep the pH up for the exact reason you mention :)

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Read this, direct from Seachem this morning:

Hello Wade,

Thank you for contacting us and for being a fan! Alkalinity for salinity should be 3.2 to 3.8 meq/L or 8.9 to 10.6 dKH. It would be extremely unusual for a bucket of salinity to have levels that do not match the analysis on the bucket. Unlike every other salt on the market, we actually test each batch of salt after it has been mixed, then we send a sample to an independent EPA registered lab to ensure that we have not made an error in testing ourselves. It is the results we receive from the independent lab that are printed on the label. This analysis is also available at our website http://www.aquavitro.com/products/salinity.html. There is a search bar in the lower right portion of the page where you can enter your lot number and it will pull up the analysis.

How do you mix your salt? When mixing salinity we recommend mixing it at room temperature and for no more than 24 hours. The longer you mix the more CO2 the salt mix will take in, causing precipitation of calcium and carbonates (decreasing alkalinity). We await your response.

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Nice post Wade! Seachem seems to really research thier numbers to ensure a consistent salt, which as we all know is important. Its funny I age my salt because I want it to drop a little because my salt tends to be high in all elements compared to what I run my tank at. I think I might look into Seachems numbers to see how closely they match what I run my tank at to eliminate this "aging" step when mixing.

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