Jump to content
Mpderksen

Photography Tutorial

Recommended Posts

This is to move the discussion from the grow-out thread, since that would be a hijack.  Settings for each of the 2 pictures are above them.  Both were shot in RAW and developed in Lightroom.  Camera is a Rebel XSi, with a the EF 50mm f/1.8 II prime lens.  Tripod mounted, no flash, LEDs at 100% for both white and blue channels.  Manual focus, 13-15" from the subject.

The first one, the Blasto, I think I need to turn down the exposure a bit more, but the goal for that shot was simple getting a clear focus.  I'm VERY happy with that.  The second shot, of the BTA, had the challenge of it being half in shadow.  I also had to increase the DOF, since it's a bigger animal.  Please comment below.  Looking to learn.

 

ISO 200 - 2.0" @ f /11Blasto2.jpg.d40acfb7ba20f1e8a578be96afce9199.jpg

 

ISO 200 - 1/6" @ f/4.0

BTA1.thumb.jpg.5d2d08f61224d97791f41ea457b866f5.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They look good! The 2.0" and 1/16" are the shutter speed settings right? Bump up the shutter speed and change the ISO to 400-1000 to compensate. By changing the shutter speed, you'd get rid of the movement blur you see in the anemone pic.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks a lot better. On the blasto if you go down a few f stops it will get sharper. You will loose some dof, but it may be worth it to get a sharper focal point.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Diamond Jack said:

Looks a lot better. On the blasto if you go down a few f stops it will get sharper. You will loose some dof, but it may be worth it to get a sharper focal point.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

do you mind explaining how that works?  In my mind, a wide DOF provides more leeway for your focal point.  Is that what you mean?  Say I go 2 stops down (bigger number, right?), that means I increase my shutter speed by 4x for the same exposure?  So instead of 2", I get 1/2"?  It's also REALLY difficult on such a small coral to be sure I'm setting the manual focus in the middle (49-year old eyes.....)

34 minutes ago, MisterReefer said:

They look good! The 2.0" and 1/16" are the shutter speed settings right? Bump up the shutter speed and change the ISO to 400-1000 to compensate. By changing the shutter speed, you'd get rid of the movement blur you see in the anemone pic.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Thanks.  2 days ago I had the L-series, 100mm macro in my Amazon cart, then I realized I should learn to use what I have first....  I probably just saved $800.

Yes, those are shutter speeds.  I had the vortechs going, so I knew there would be some blur.  but I did want to limit the variables between shots.  As recommended in the other thread, I'm using AV mode, rather than manual.  But I can try again later.  The reason I was using 1600 before (which I agree was too high), was to speed up the shutter to eliminate blur.  I'm guessing for my SPS, the flow won't matter too much, but for the LPS, especially my large torch, shutting down all flow will be necessary for tack-sharp focus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Diamond Jack said:

The lens has a sweet spot where it is sharper. I don't know how to explain it, but I have verified it. Here is an article that explains it exactly for this lens.

https://digital-photography-school.com/sweet-spots-why-your-f1-8-isnt-so-great-at-f1-8/


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Okay, that makes sense.  I keep on needing to refresh myself on the basics, since I'm learning to go beyond point-and-shoot.

For the Blasto pic, which is really the main topic for this thread:  f/4 is a bigger opening than f/11, so I get a shallower DOF, right?  So why, for the same ISO, did I need a 2 second exposure, as compared to the 1/6" for the BTA?  (yes, the Blasto is in the shade, so maybe that's it).

I really appreciate the patient, helpful advice here.  Hopefully I can ask questions that others are too embarrassed to ask, to spread the knowledge....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Mpderksen said:

Okay, that makes sense.  I keep on needing to refresh myself on the basics, since I'm learning to go beyond point-and-shoot.

For the Blasto pic, which is really the main topic for this thread:  f/4 is a bigger opening than f/11, so I get a shallower DOF, right?  So why, for the same ISO, did I need a 2 second exposure, as compared to the 1/6" for the BTA?  (yes, the Blasto is in the shade, so maybe that's it).

I really appreciate the patient, helpful advice here.  Hopefully I can ask questions that others are too embarrassed to ask, to spread the knowledge....

Yes, f/4 is a larger aperture (bigger opening) than f/11 and at same distance, f/4 would create a shallower DOF.

Yup, you got the answer to your question...the blasto is in the shade, so the camera needed more light. 

I have the 100mm macro and it's on sale for 799.99 tax free at B&Hphoto! But then again, there's more extras with Amazon! I suggest renting it first to see if it's a lens you will actually use.

I really want to purchase the Canon MPE 65mm because its 1x-5x, whereas the 100mm is 1x. Check it out!

This was taken last night, under both actinic and 12k PC lights with the 100mm macro:

about 1 foot away from lens to frag, f/11, 1/15 sec, ISO 400, no editing other than cropping. 

i-Qpnkvc9-X2.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only know the basics as well. Always trying to learn and get better. 2 seconds is way too long for trying to shoot coral. The lower the f stop number the wider open the lens is and the more light it can take it in faster. That allows you to shoot in darker situations. If the blasto is shaded you have to either get it lit up more or your going to have to sacrifice image sharpness and go down to a lower f stop so your shot isn't too dark. If you have lightroom it shouldn't be a problem to lighten up an image in post production. It is easyier to lighten a shot than to fix an overexposed/ blown out one.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, I did exactly the same:  ISO 400 - f/11, 1/15".  50mm, instead of 100mm.  I had the LEDs at 100% (but have NO idea what K they are).  I'm using a WB of "cloudy", which is 6000K, since that's the highest I think my XSi can go without sticking a piece of white plastic in the tank to set my Custom WB.

This time, I didn't adjust ANY levels in Lightroom.  This is a cropped, exported RAW image.  I must say the focus is MUCH better already. 

BTW, what kind of coral is this?  One of the club members (Joey or Ricardo) gave it to me when they got some of my free LPS.  It's doing great!

SPS1.thumb.jpg.6aa71c4932305ad8675e25263b5958d9.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Diamond Jack said:

I only know the basics as well. Always trying to learn and get better. 2 seconds is way too long for trying to shoot coral. The lower the f stop number the wider open the lens is and the more light it can take it in faster. That allows you to shoot in darker situations. If the blasto is shaded you have to either get it lit up more or your going to have to sacrifice image sharpness and go down to a lower f stop so your shot isn't too dark. If you have lightroom it shouldn't be a problem to lighten up an image in post production. It is easyier to lighten a shot than to fix an overexposed/ blown out one.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

super true.  In fact, I'm shocked just how much information is in a RAW file.  I've taken shots that seem completely dark, and then pull them up in Lightroom to look just fine.. My goal in this thread started with wanting the basics for a crisp shot without specific worry about composition.  That's next, obviously.  I'm about to start a build thread, and I wanted to have a shot of every coral so that I can look back next year and check the growth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, f/4 is a larger aperture (bigger opening) than f/11 and at same distance, f/4 would create a shallower DOF.

Yup, you got the answer to your question...the blasto is in the shade, so the camera needed more light. 

I have the 100mm macro and it's on sale for 799.99 tax free at B&Hphoto! But then again, there's more extras with Amazon! I suggest renting it first to see if it's a lens you will actually use.

I really want to purchase the Canon MPE 65mm because its 1x-5x, whereas the 100mm is 1x. Check it out!

This was taken last night, under both actinic and 12k PC lights with the 100mm macro:

about 1 foot away from lens to frag, f/11, 1/15 sec, ISO 400, no editing other than cropping. 

i-Qpnkvc9-X2.jpg

 

 

Man that is a crisp shot. Well done.

 

Also, man looking back when I had the ef 100mm macro I took some horrible shots. I actually have done better with the 50mm. It was probably due to inexpierience with the 100mm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, MisterReefer said:

Thanks guys! Michael, if you have a nice clean and unused frag disk, you can use that for white balancing! 

actually, I don't.  but good idea.  I was going to purchase a single white ceramic tile next time I was in HD and use that.

Next question:  where should I put up an album for public viewing as I start taking shots?  Or just start a build-thread?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
actually, I don't.  but good idea.  I was going to purchase a single white ceramic tile next time I was in HD and use that.
Next question:  where should I put up an album for public viewing as I start taking shots?  Or just start a build-thread?


You can just start your own photo thread in the tank build and project journal area. Maybe we can get a reef photography sub forum someday.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×